Sense of Equilibrium


     Mechanoreceptors in the semicircular canals detect rotational and/or angular movement of the head (rotational equilibrium), while mechanoreceptors in the utricle and saccule detect movement of the head in the vertical or horizontal planes (gravitational equilibrium) (Fig. 9.14).
     Through their communication with the brain, these mechanoreceptors help us achieve equilibrium, but other structures in the body are also involved. For example, we already mentioned that proprioceptors are necessary for maintaining our equilibrium. Vision, if available, provides extremely helpful input the brain can act upon.
Figure 9.14 Mechanoreceptors for equilibrium. a. Rotational equilibrium. The ampullae of the semicircular canals contain hair cells with stereocilia embedded in a cupula. When the head rotates, the cupula is displaced, bending the stereocilia. Thereafter, nerve impulses travel in the vestibular nerve to the brain. b. Gravitational equilibrium. The utricle and the saccule contain hair cells with stereocilia embedded in an otolithic membrane. When the head bends, otoliths are displaced, causing the membrane to sag and the stereocilia to bend. If the stereocilia bend toward the kinocilium, the longest of the stereocilia, nerve impulses increase in the vestibular nerve. If the stereocilia bend away from the kinocilium, nerve impulses decrease in the vestibular nerve. The difference tells the brain in which direction the head moved.
Gravitational Equilibrium Pathway
    
Gravitational equilibrium depends on the utricle and saccule, two membranous sacs located in the vestibule. Both of these sacs contain little hair cells, whose stereocilia are embedded within a gelatinous material called an otolithic membrane. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) granules, or otoliths, rest on this membrane. The utricle is especially sensitive to horizontal (back-forth) movements and the bending of the head, while the saccule responds best to vertical (up-down) movements.

     When the body is still, the otoliths in the utricle and the saccule rest on the otolithic membrane above the hair cells. When the head bends or the body moves in the horizontal and vertical planes, the otoliths are displaced and the otolithic membrane sags, bending the stereocilia of the hair cells beneath. If the stereocilia move toward the largest stereocilium, called the kinocilium, nerve impulses increase in the vestibular nerve. If the stereocilia move away from the kinocilium, nerve impulses decrease in the vestibular nerve. If you are upside down, nerve impulses in the vestibular nerve cease. These data tell the brain the direction of the movement of the head at the moment. The brain uses this information to maintain gravitational equilibrium through appropriate motor output to various skeletal muscles that can right our present position in space as need be.
Table 9.2 summarizes the functions of the parts of the ear.
Mechanoreceptors for equilibrium
Rotational Equilibrium Pathway
    
Rotational equilibrium involves the three semicircular canals, which are arranged so that there is one in each dimension of space. The base of each of the three canals, called the ampulla, is slightly enlarged. Little hair cells, whose stereocilia are embedded within a gelatinous material called a cupula, are found within the ampullae. Because of the way the semicircular canals are arranged, each ampulla responds to head rotation in a different plane of space. As fluid within a semicircular canal flows over and displaces a cupula, the stereocilia of the hair cells bend, and the pattern of impulses carried by the vestibular nerve to the brain changes. The brain uses information from the hair cells within ampulla of the semicircular canals to maintain rotational equilibrium through appropriate motor output to various skeletal muscles that can right our present position in space as need be.
     Sometimes data regarding rotational equilibrium bring about unfortunate circumstances. For example, continuous movement of fluid in the semicircular canals causes one form of motion sickness. Vertigo is dizziness and a sensation of rotation. It is possible to simulate a feeling of vertigo by spinning rapidly and stopping suddenly. When the eyes are rapidly jerked back to a midline position, the person feels like the room is spinning. This shows that the eyes are also involved in our sense of equilibrium.
Functions of the Parts of the Ear
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